Football, the religion

Most Buddhist people in Myanmar spend at least a part of their life in a monastery and adopt a disciplined lifestyle, learning the teachings of Buddhism as part of their faith and for spiritual credit. Practicing monks are expected to get by with the the minimum of possessions, but it’s fair to say that most monasteries have a football lying around. Once classes are over for the day, the ball comes out and it’s time to dream about being the next Messi or Ronaldo. I spent some time traveling around the country in 2013 and decided to shoot this as a photo essay.

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16 replies

  1. What I found incredible while living in Thailand was that young boys were required to spend a certain amount of time in a monastery. Singapore requires “public service” (not religious) and by those means men often find their career goals.

  2. Reblogged this on MULIEBRAL VIEWPOINT: and commented:
    This brings to mind the cultural aspects of each nation. We have lived in Thailand and understand from our associations there that Thailand requires young men to give a set amount of time to studying in a monastery. Families are allowed to choose the time they study, so some are older and some are younger when they begin their religious training.

    Singapore requires one year of civil service from every young person before he/she enters college and by that many have found rewarding careers.

    In decades past the US required 2 years of military service from every male 18 years of age or over. Some opted out by declaring they were conscientious objectors, but not many. Some opted to move to Canada where there was no required military service.

    Now comes the question: When it comes to training our children, are we to think that childhood has no responsibilities? If children do not learn responsibility in childhood, can they be as effective as adults? Is it always the parents’ responsibility to provide a carefree life? Will Christianity survive if children are not taught early?

  3. it was good to see the kid-monks out of their spartan life.
    When i was going through this photographic series it seemed that football is not merely a sport to this kids, it was a salvation from their austere lifestyle.

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